Home » Real Estate » Bridgeville, California, the EBAY Town, Is For Sale Again

Bridgeville, California, the EBAY Town, Is For Sale Again

Bridgeville, California, the town made famous when it was sold on EBay 5 years ago, is for sale again. The former Pony Express stop has had a checkered past. It gained great notoriety after the sale on EBay, was resold to a gentlemen who eventually committed suicide, and is now up for sale again.

The asking price is 1.3 million dollars for the town.

The picturesque but dilapidated village on the Van Duzen River gained international notoriety five years ago when its 83 acres were put on the cyber-auction block _ the first town ever up for auction on eBay.
The town was once a hub for a local stagecoach route and a stop on the Pony Express. It now includes eight houses, a post office and a cafe.
Daniel La Paille, 25, a Los Angeles entertainment manager and college student, bought Bridgeville in August 2006 for $1.25 million from Orange County banker Bruce Krall.
Krall had purchased the former timber town for $700,000 after the buyer in the original 2002 eBay auction backed out. Krall re-listed the town on eBay last year, saying he couldn’t continue to afford making restorations.
La Paille raised hopes among residents when he brought in work crews to repair many of the town’s homes and began building a park. But in November, La Paille shot himself in the chest in Los Angeles, according to the Los Angeles County Coroner’s office, and town improvement efforts soon faltered.via WTOP

19 comments

  1. This is still one of the craziest things I've seen for sale on eBAY.

  2. I was all set to pony up the money until I saw the last owner offed himself.

  3. This is a story that just keeps giving…

    Keep us tuned in, Tom.

  4. How many the current population of Bridgeville?

  5. I basically grew up there……I miss it…..in a strange little way. Very small. I think under 30 residents in Bridgeville (stated on some website). But its a very beautiful area, that I can remember. Swimming with my friends in the swimming hole on a hot summer day. I haven't been there in years. Strange it was on Ebay..

  6. I spent several weeks on a commune near Bridgeville way back in the summer of 1969 or '70. I was having too much fun back then and cannot remember the actual year. Anyway the folks in residence there took me in after one of their group picked me up hitchhiking up that way with no real destination in mind. I DO still remember many of the folks there and the great time I had all those years ago; the folks were building an alternative school on 80 acres if I recall. There was a waterfall with a pool beneath for bathing. The chief dude's name was Ben Ortiz…if anybody knows anything about the place or Ben Ortiz reads this, please reply. Thanks and peace, as we used to say!

    • I lived on the commune you mention outside of Bridgeville from 1970 – 72. There were 3 owners of that parcel but the person who started the commune was named Ben Martinez, not Ben Ortiz.
      We never did get the school started. Like a lot of hippie dreams it just went up in smoke (pun intended).
      There was a man named Lloyd Paulus who owned the rental shacks in town at that time. He was a mean, rotten SOB, universally hated throughout the area. The odd thing is his wife, who ran the post office, was just the sweetest person you could imagine. I think the key to their marriage was that he was gone a lot working for the state road crew.
      When he was in town he would proposition the hippie women for sex, including my wife one time. I should have messed him up for that but I was into peace & love at the time and let it pass.
      We were married in the meadow in front of the dome. I remember home brewed beer, pot and salmon cooked over hot coals in a pit.
      We left there in 1972. I eventually lost touch with Ben & Shelley. I wish I could find them now.
      I visited in 2000 but the state had built a new bridge bypassing the town entirely. The ranger at Grizzley Creek park where we were camping said the town was full of druggies and it sure looked like it had seen better days.
      We walked around Deer Field Ranch, where the dome and commune was located but I couldn't find the old place. We were afraid of walking into someone's marijuana patch so we got out of there. We did walk by a big tree with a sign "Upa Tree" which seemed to be someone's treehouse abode.
      Like another poster mentioned, I have good memories of swimming in the Van Duzen

  7. Nice of you to make humor off of somebody "offing themselves." daniel did not take his own life because of the responsibility that bridgeville came with. construction will eventually continue after legal matters following danny's suicide cease. so for those critics out there: why dont you put that c*** back in your mouth and be silent. bridgeville will be owned by my in-laws for some time to come, and will be a better town than when it was sold on EBAY!!!!!

  8. Believe that!!!!

  9. My alternative income stream is selling stuffs on Ebay and i can say that i earn a lot from selling on Ebay",'

  10. Pamela Thompson Wims

    I was just wondering if this Daniel LaPaille is the son John Clarence LaPaille. I am from the LaPaille family and had corresponded a bit with a Daniel LaPaille concerning his father and then all communications broke. I am so sorry to hear that this young man felt the need to commit suicide. Such a waste of a fine person. Since the LaPaille name is such a rare one in this country, I feel sure this is the same Daniel that I corresponded with. I would love to know more about him and his family. Thank you!

  11. I lived on the commune you mention outside of Bridgeville from 1970 – 72. There were 3 owners of that parcel but the person who started the commune was named Ben Martinez, not Ben Ortiz.
    We never did get the school started. Like a lot of hippie dreams it just went up in smoke (pun intended).
    There was a man named Lloyd Paulus who owned the rental shacks in town at that time. He was a mean, rotten SOB, universally hated throughout the area. The odd thing is his wife, who ran the post office, was just the sweetest person you could imagine. I think the key to their marriage was that he was gone a lot working for the state road crew.
    When he was in town he would proposition the hippie women for sex, including my wife one time. I should have messed him up for that but I was into peace & love at the time and let it pass.
    We were married in the meadow in front of the dome. I remember home brewed beer, pot and salmon cooked over hot coals in a pit.
    We left there in 1972. I eventually lost touch with Ben & Shelley. I wish I could find them now.
    I visited in 2000 but the state had built a new bridge bypassing the town entirely. The ranger at Grizzley Creek park where we were camping said the town was full of druggies and it sure looked like it had seen better days.
    We walked around Deer Field Ranch, where the dome and commune was located but I couldn't find the old place. We were afraid of walking into someone's marijuana patch so we got out of there. We did walk by a big tree with a sign "Upa Tree" which seemed to be someone's treehouse abode.
    Like another poster mentioned, I have good memories of swimming in the Van Duzen.

  12. I just checked out the Bridgeville Community Center's website and monthly newsletters and it seems the community has experienced a renaissance since I last visited in 2000.
    I apologize to the citizens of Bridgeville for my former remark about the rumored druggies in town.
    There were many good people in Bridgeville when I lived there. The couple who owned the store at the time (is there a chance the store will open again sometime?), a rancher by the name of Dwight May, Laura Paulus who ran the post office and a collection of local loggers who befriended the young, inexperienced back to the land types.

  13. John C. LaPaille Jr

    Look don’t know what all this talk about my brother or about the Bridgeville community. People really should mind there own business and pay attention to there own family cause everyone has one!!

  14. I grew up in Bridgeville in the 50's. I lived just 2 or 3 miles to the east at a location they called Swaynes Flat. Fished the Van Duzen river and a small creek out by my house every day of the year almost. I was one of about 10 kids in class run by the principal, and there were 3 or 4 grades in the class. I have been back a couple of times in the past 15 or 20 years and a lot of changes have taken place. Bridgeville proper hasn't changed much, but the Van Duzen river by where I used to swim has changed course completely When I was young there was a store on the river side of town that had everything and at that time was also the P.O. Across the street was a small building that had a sign on it that said, EAT. The main street coming from Fortuna came into town and became a T. Left was to the mill and school and right was crossing the river on the Van Duzen. At the head of this T was the owner of the town. Great place for a boy to grow up. No worries, lots to do, fishing, hiking, bear hunting with a stick, swimming in the river, blackberry picking, gathering of hazel nuts, and watching out for rattlesnakes.. Fond memories for sure. Sorry I guess I have been rambling……..

  15. This is the best resource for the history of Bridgeville that I have found yet

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